Virtual offices are gaining ground all over the world. But what about out of this world? Can you imagine a virtual office in outer space? Richard Branson probably can.

Branson, the mastermind behind the Virgin empire, made history on Sunday as he took a step closer to launching the first commercial spaceliner. Branson’s team executed the first successful glide involving the mother ship of Virgin Galactic, WhiteKnightTwo, and the smaller spaceship called the VSS Enterprise. Both spaceships climbed to an altitude of 45,000 feet before returning to earth 15 minutes later.

Now, imagine the possibilities. We’ve already seen U.S. space shuttle astronauts tweeting from outer space. Are virtual offices too far behind? Just as we see businessmen working from airplane phones and using laptops in first class, I can see the day coming when we’ll have virtual offices on space ships. Who knows? Maybe virtual offices will make their way to one of these planets that can sustain life and we’ll see a premier business address in another galaxy.

OK, so that’s a lot of imagination. The point is, today’s technologies already allow people to send e-mail and other messages from outer space. How much more can you work from your home office, raise your productivity and project a professional business image using these same sorts of virtual office technologies?

Today’s web conferencing solutions may not be ready for outer space (although I would bet they might be), but virtual office technologies can let you hold web conferences from anywhere in the world with people anywhere in the world. And mobile virtual office applications set the stage to help you keep productivity levels high even on the road.

Davinci Virtual doesn’t offer virtual office space on Mars—at least not yet. But you can find virtual offices in Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, London, Miami, and beyond. Check out how Davinci Virtual can help your company forward its alternative workplace strategy in just about any major city in the world.

Check out this video on Branson's test flight.