SYDNEY—Who would have thought that virtual office use could contribute so much to a nation's economy? But that’s the case in Australia.

Indeed, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard considers telecommuting from virtual offices to be the key to Australia's gross domestic product growth. Specifically, she predicts over $3.2 billion in growth and anticipates more than 25,000 new jobs in coming years.

Gillard says the Australian public service sector is “harnessing the benefits of new technology and work patterns will be important for Australia if we are to embrace the opportunities of the Asian century."

American small businesses can also prosper through allowing employees to telecommute from a virtual office. In the recent blog post entitled, "ABCs of Telecommuting," The Business Finance Store discusses the benefits of opening a business up to telecommuting and virtual office space.

“One of the interesting things about telecommuting is the fact that people who enjoy learning about technology are very attracted to telecommuting. Since some of them assume they’ll be using their current or past technology at work, they are more likely to join your company and may not need extensive training or new equipment,” the post says.

“Smart employees who have experience telecommuting or who go out of their way to stay current with new computers or software are very productive. Many companies are hiring them over other potential job candidates and letting them work remotely. This means no relocation costs and fewer office equipment expenses. The savings per person are limitless with the right staff. Just re-evaluate which positions can be done remotely and you’ll start saving instantly.”

Indeed, American companies are already starting to adopt telecommuting from a virtual office. Virtual office use is on the rise in the United States, in Sydney and in many other areas of the world because it drives employee productivity to new heights—and, as it turns out, can impact a nation’s economy.