BOSTON—Women work longer days and report working more often on vacation than their male counterparts. Yet, women also report greater perceived satisfaction with their compensation. So says the FIT’s first Report on Workplace Culture.

Let’s drill into the numbers and look at how virtual office space might ultimately help the cause. Although the majority of respondents (91%) confine their working hours to five days each week, almost half (47%) claim to work more than eight hours each day.

Although it’s not clear how many of those women, if any, use virtual offices, I am confident that those women who work more than eight hours a day are doing at least some workshifting—working remotely from a virtual office on the home front in the early morning or after business hours as they strive to keep pace in a competitive business world.

Fifty-four percent of women report working nine or more hours a day, compared to 41 percent of men. And women (67%) are slightly more willing to work on their vacations than men (60%). Again, women who are working this many hours or working during vacation are almost assuredly tapping into virtual office technologies of some sort. Virtual office technologies help employees maintain some degree productivity regardless of the setting—even poolside on vacation.

A very strong majority (84%) of all employees report that they were "actually sick or caring for a sick child" the last time they called in sick. Roughly 1 in 5 men and 1 in 7 women are lying when it comes to their most recent sick day. Instead, they revealed that they were playing hooky, taking mental health days, suffering from hangovers or interviewing for another job.

With virtual office technologies, women—and men alike—can continue working from a virtual office on the home front while they care for their sick child or even while they are battling a cold. Although employees may not work a full eight-hour day, even the ability to take an important call, answer e-mails in a timely fashion, join a web conference or work on a PPT presentation can keep the engines of productivity revving.