BOSTON—Most working moms are empowered as role models for their children. Most working moms have professional ambitions. And most working moms feel like they are receiving support from their spouses and families. So says a new survey from

Still, working moms aren’t completely satisfied. Specifically, working mothers aren’t content with feeling what they call “mommy tracked” in the office. Fifty-eight percent of working moms aspire to move higher in the professional ranks. But 73 percent of companies where working moms are employed don’t offer childcare benefits, and only 18 percent offer flex-spending accounts.

There’s even less opportunity for on-site childcare, emergency back up care and subsidized childcare. And 39 percent had to miss work during the last year because of a childcare issue. Virtual offices could be part of the solution for these ambitious working moms.

"This survey makes it clear that much still needs to be done in the workplace to support them in motherhood,” says Katie Bugbee, Managing Editor of “Women now hold more than half of the entry-level jobs at American blue-chip companies. According to the 2011 White House Report on Women, women will account for nearly 60 percent of total undergraduate enrollment by 2019. When nearly 40 percent of the female workforce has to miss work because of a childcare issue, the productivity loss is felt on the bottom line."

What would it be like if working moms were able to tap into virtual office technologies, at least part time, when childcare issues arise? Virtual offices would empower working mothers to deal with childcare emergencies, like kids with the chickenpox or the flu that need supervision, without completely missing work. Virtual offices would allow working moms to stay plugged in, still attend important meetings virtually, and otherwise stay productive even if they have to leave early to pick up a sick child from school.

Check out this video on the mommy wars debate: