Is working from a virtual office more effective than working from a traditional office? That’s the subject of a Bruce Kennedy article in AOL’s Daily Finance.

Kennedy points to a couple of surveys in his article, including one from WorldatWork that cites the rise of the number of Americans who work either from their homes or remotely at least one day a week. The number rose 74 percent between 2005 and 2008.

Sometime tells me that number would be even higher if the study ran through the end of 2010, where more folks were starting businesses out of their home and more companies were exploring alternative workplace strategies.

Kennedy also noted a study from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. That 2008 study reveals that traditional office workers feel they have “decreased flexibility and a higher workload, and the ensuing greater frustration that comes with coordinating in an environment with more extensive co-worker telework.”

As you all know, I work from a virtual office. I do value face-to-face meetings when they deal with planning and strategy, but I am living proof that it’s not really necessary. From my Ft. Lauderdale virtual office I can talk to clients in Salt Lake City, Manhattan, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, or right down the street in Miami.

From my virtual office, I escape the Miami traffic with all the road raged drivers. I can better balance my family life and, perhaps more importantly for my clients, I can get more done in less time because I’m not distracted by ringing phones from the cubicle right next door.

It works for me. Does it work for you?