MIAMI-I just read an article in Forbes magazine that offers what the author calls “surprising results” about virtual office workers.

Kate Harrison, an eco-entrepreneur, penned the article entitled, “Lazy and Pregnant? New Study Profiles People Who Work From Home With Surprising Results.”

“Visions of your work commute becoming just a short stroll to your home office may seem like a dream, but it’s a reality for a growing number of people who have jobs that encourage telecommuting,” Harrison writes. “If the idea of working from home excites you, you may be surprised just how many jobs offer this flexible career option.”

Then Harrison examines the results of a FlexJobs survey and offers three points that shed new light on virtual office workers.

1. Virtual office workers are older and smarter than. She points to the Telework Research report, which shows that Gen Y is attracted to virtual office work. FlexJobs data, meanwhile, supports this with a finding that the average flexible job seeker is between 30 and 59. FlexJobs reports 82 percent have a college degree and 35 percent have graduate degrees.

2. Family, better health and lower stress levels are important. Harrison also pointed out FlexJobs study findings that show more than half of virtual office workers are married and 70 percent are in a relationship where both spouses work. Only 60 percent have rug rats and family is not the primary motivator for searching for virtual office jobs.

3. Virtual office workers want to be more productive. Virtual office workers want to be more productive, Harrison notes, not lazy. I could have told you that without the FlexJobs study.

Harrison asks, “It’s possible that the ideal balance between in-office work and telecommuting has yet to be discovered, but just imagine spending every Monday or Friday at home, while still keeping up with everything at work. Sounds almost too good to be true, doesn’t it?”

It may sound too good to be true, but working from a virtual office can give you all that and more.