NEW YORK—Every wondered which flexible jobs arrangements are most in demand?, a job search site that targets Baby Boomers and stay-at-home moms that want to re-enter the workforce, is offering some insight with a list of the most searched categories for flexible work options.

The list includes flexible start and end times; the ability to work from home, some or all of the time; the ability to take time off during the workday occasionally for family duties; return to work gradually after childbirth or adoption; career breaks or caregiving leave of absences and the ability to move from full-time to part-time and then back again later without a loss of status or pay. Virtual offices fit into the work from home some of the time or all of the time category.

"President Obama recently voiced the concern for women, that they may be finding the job market too hostile when looking for work—while trying to maintain their childcare and elder care duties—and they could decide not to look anymore," says Jacqueline Sloboda, founder of "He is right on in that the problem is that women constitute more than half of the population. For this reason, many employers are willing to go the extra mile in order to keep and retain good talent."

Indeed, studies show that employers are beginning to increase options for managing when and where employees work—as well as reducing some options that affect how they work—as the economy recovers. In a move to attract and retain top talent, employers are using non-financial rewards like telecommuting from a virtual office.

And it could work. Most people want some degree of flexibility in the way they work and a virtual office is a convenient, low-cost solution. According to FlexHourJobs, 87 percent of Baby Boomers say they want some say in when and where they work. Almost 79 percent of Gen X'ers and 89 percent of Millennials are also joining the ranks interested in the possibility of working some or part of the time remotely from home.