Is the federal government adopting teleworking? Yes, in increasing numbers. The new law that was recently passed should help spur adoption. But where were we before the law?

According to a study from Booz Allen Hamilton, less than 6 percent of all full-time federal workers telework even one day a month—just 102,900 federal employees of the 1.9 million on the government payroll when the federal survey was conducted in 2008.

Booz Allen reports that only 44 of 78 agencies, or 56 percent of federal organizations, have integrated telework into their formal continuity of operations planning—a crucial element needed to make sure essential employees can support agency missions and meet important public needs during a natural disaster or a crisis such as a terrorist attack or a pandemic.

Booz Allen concludes that due to the underutilization of telework, part-time work and job sharing, the majority of federal agencies are missing out on the opportunity to reap savings on real estate, infrastructure, basic operating costs and energy usage, and to improve their business processes and increase productivity. In other words, it is an alternative workplace strategy that pays dividends on many levels.

What does that mean? Room for growth. Davinci Virtual Office Solutions is expecting the next report from Booz Allen Hamilton to show tremendous growth in teleworking in the federal government. And that could spur teleworking among government contractors.

Davinci Virtual Office Solutions has seven virtual offices in Washington, D.C.:

  • The Willard

  • Washington DC Office Center

  • Bethesda DC

  • MPA DC

  • Farragut Business Center

  • One Metro Business Center

  • Connecticut Avenue Business Center


Let’s look at the Connecticut Avenue virtual offices. Located at 1250 Connecticut Avenue, you can rent this D.C. virtual office space for as little as $95 a month. It comes with all the usual bells and whistles. First of all, you get to use the prime business address and have a place for your clients to send mail and packages, or drop them off. You can use the business support center there when you needed it, or even rent a conference room or day office space for important meetings or when you just need a quiet place to work.

Check out this video on Washington, D.C.: